Ratchet and Clank cave

A Further Look at 2016’s Ratchet and Clank – More Gameplay Revealed

GameSpot recently streamed some all-new gameplay for the 2016 reboot of Ratchet and Clank, making its way to the Playstation 4 next month. Conducted by Rob Handlery and Mike MaHardy, the stream showcased some of Ratchet and Clank’s new features, as well as several familiar ones.

Ratchet and Clank seem to have undergone something of an interface-lift. Menu aesthetics appear flashier, sleeker and generally cleaner than they appeared in 2002’s original game. Although the content was streamed, which can often be misleading, the control scheme also seemed more responsive, with Ratchet now nippier than ever before during the game’s platforming segments. Controls were mentioned not to be sensitive to the PS4’s analogue sticks, but were not pinpointed as particularly bothersome or restrictive.

Ratchet and Clank’s familiar worlds breathe now though a 1080p display, comprising newly integrated scopic shots of some of the original game’s most recognisable characters, as well as their intergalactic habitats. We see Skid McMarx make his reprise in newfangled detail, as well as the lovably nerdy vendor, Big Al. Also translated from the original game are the hoverboard races, taxi systems to transport Ratchet between areas and the unforgettable slime-puking Amoeboids.

However, the game also carries some newly embezzled components, in addition to its nostalgic throwbacks. Ratchet and Clank sees the introduction of spacecraft combat, something that wasn’t introduced to the series until later, and as commented in the stream – “nothing like this.” Airborne combat looks to be furnished with a targeting system, to allow for swift shooting without losing your bearings. Also included is the Groovitron – a specialised weapon not included in the original, that forces enemies to get funky and boogie down after getting shot. The Swingshot- the gadget Ratchet uses to swing between platforms in the original exists as a default here, rather than being picked up later on in the story. Cut scenes are also understandably more filmic, with a visual quality virtually equal to that of the coinciding film, the trailer for which was released in October last year.

Ratchet

The most notable narrative addition to 2016’s shooter-platformer is that of its charismatic narrator. Being a reboot of the first game in the classic platforming series – Ratchet and Clank – this game is told from the reminiscent perspective of the doltishly corrupt Captain Qwark; a witty glimmer of self-awareness amidst the thrill of voluminous gunnery. As such, he describes the Ratchet’s endeavours as the player moves throughout the environment. This makes ample room for the the series’ trademark humour to shine through. Coinciding with the film – also scheduled for an April release – the return of the plucky Lombax mechanic and his logical robotic partner across big and small screens alike is something long-time fans can look forward to.

You can watch GameSpot’s livestream of Ratchet and Clank here.

According to a Playstation Blog post back in January, Ratchet and Clank will make its landing on April 22 in the UK and April 15 in France, and April 20 “everywhere else in the PAL region.” The post also mentioned that those who pre-order the game will also gain access to exclusive weapon, The Boomer.

The film is scheduled to hit cinemas on April 29. The film includes an original story written by Insomniac Games Senior Writer T.J Fixman, as well as Gerry Swallow (Ice Age: The Meltdown) and Kevin Munroe (TMNT), who is also currently working on the Sly Cooper movie that will be launching later this year.

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Charlie is a platforming romantic from England, that still speaks in a fashion that died with the Elizabethan era. Having been gaming since the days of Crash Bandicoot, he champions the Playstation, and is only a little bit embarassed that Super Mario Land keeps spelling his defeat.

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