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Review: Diablo III – Ultimate Evil Edition

Diablo III: Ultimate Evil Edition is one of the many games being re-released with all the bells and whistles for both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Containing all of its tasty DLC, along with some new exclusive Titbits to entice those who may feel that bringing it to a new platform is not a good reason to have a second copy of a game they have already completed again and again… I was one of these people.

Developer: Blizzard Entertainment
Publisher: Blizzard Entertainment
Reviewed on: PlayStation 4
Also Available On: PC/XBox One/PlayStation 3/Xbox 360
Release Date: Out Now

I loved Diablo III when it first came out and constantly played  it for about two weeks Getting to paragon levels and finely tuning my crafting skills over multiple play-throughs and characters.  Despite this, I hadn’t played for about a year or even thought much about it until recently and thought it was kind of pointless getting a game I had already completed just for some little add-ons and tweaks to the definition. But I became happily disappointed with myself, I’d been loaned PlayStation 4 a copy for a week and played until I got repetitive strain in my thumbs – totally worth it! Differences in the quality of the visuals were fairly apparent, I had previously played it on the Xbox 360 and thought the cutscenes looked beautiful. However, the clarity and realism of the chapter 5’s cutscenes was incredible and I wish it was the same for the previous chapters, which looked slightly grainy and plastic-like in comparison.

Diablo III 1

Chapter 5 felt like a game in itself, I played the entire campaign before delving into it and it seemed twice the size of the other chapters.  It had great depth and character work with a lot more specific story/interactions based on your base class choice.  During a Co-Op session, this was a little confusing as it altered the conversation progression depending on who happened to press X – switching from my imposing barbarian ancestors to some dead pompous witch hunters (not that I’m biased).

The generic enemies added some variety but there were issues with being spammed by low-level swarming baddies at every turn within one dungeon, which gets extremely tiresome. I get that there are some enemies who come in swarms, but you become a bit desensitised by them and they just become an annoyance more than a threat.  In one such dungeon, to distract myself from this onslaught I just started breaking stuff only to find I inadvertently completed a mission which I had no idea I had even started.  There did seem to be a disparity in loot drops with a lot of random low level crap.

Some of the people in the main town seemed like they were larger parts of the quest than they were. Sure, they were probably part of the challenge section of the game but I found myself just talking to them just to remove the annoying asterisk on the map so I could find and focus on the actual missions at hand.

Diablo III 2

The Mystic was a nice addition, I liked being able to customize what I was wearing but the re-rolling of stats proved pretty fruitless for me.  Several times I tried to reroll a 2% chance to freeze only to be rewarded with

1. 2% chance to Freeze
2. 2% chance to Freeze
3. 3% chance to Freeze

This was a complete waste of my  gold but at least I can co-ordinate my shoes with my axe.

The removal of blacksmith and jeweller tomes was a good idea but once I was at level 10 I needed something else but it would only show me an icon of it, not tell me what it actually was.  Through some research I discovered it was breath of death and was only available in the rifts.

The rifts are pretty fun – I love a good dungeon crawl and now that the kill counts have been patched, I feel a sense of achievement by the time I reach the raid boss plus the increased legendary drop doesn’t suck either.  To complete a rift you need 100 kills but now not all enemies are created equal – the one hit wonders may give you a portion of a kill whilst those bigger meanies give you a little extra; it balances the system out and feels a loot fairer.  It does take some time though and I have not played as many of these rifts as I would like so only time will tell if it gives the game a greater sense of replayability than I’d previously thought.

  • Reaper of Souls does not feel like a random addition
  • Crusader is a nice variant on the weapons-based class
  • Rifts are worth the challenge

  • Pointless Stat re-rolling
  • Tiresome swarming enemies
  • Crusader feels similar to Barbarian

Diablo III: Ultimate Evil Edition is one of the many games being re-released with all the bells and whistles for both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Containing all of its tasty DLC, along with some new exclusive Titbits to entice those who may feel that bringing it to a new platform is not a good reason to have a second copy of a game they have already completed again and again… I was one of these people. Developer: Blizzard Entertainment Publisher: Blizzard Entertainment Reviewed on: PlayStation 4 Also Available On: PC/XBox One/PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 Release Date: Out Now I loved Diablo III when it first came out and constantly played  it for about two weeks Getting to paragon levels and finely tuning my crafting skills over multiple play-throughs and characters.  Despite this, I hadn't played for about a year or even thought much about it until recently and thought it was kind of pointless getting a game I had already completed just for some little add-ons and tweaks to the definition. But I became happily disappointed with myself, I'd been loaned PlayStation 4 a copy for a week and played until I got repetitive strain in my thumbs - totally worth it! Differences in the quality of the visuals were fairly apparent, I had previously played it on the Xbox 360 and thought the cutscenes looked beautiful. However, the clarity and realism of the chapter 5's cutscenes was incredible and I wish it was the same for the previous chapters, which looked slightly grainy and plastic-like in comparison. Chapter 5 felt like a game in itself, I played the entire campaign before delving into it and it seemed twice the size of the other chapters.  It had great depth and character work with a lot more specific story/interactions based on your base class choice.  During a Co-Op session, this was a little confusing as it altered the conversation progression depending on who happened to press X – switching from my imposing barbarian ancestors to some dead pompous witch hunters (not that I’m biased). The generic enemies added some variety but there were issues with being spammed by low-level swarming baddies at every turn within one dungeon, which gets extremely tiresome. I get that there are some enemies who come in swarms, but you become a bit desensitised by them and they just become an annoyance more than a threat.  In one such dungeon, to distract myself from this onslaught I just started breaking stuff only to find I inadvertently completed a mission which I had no idea I had even started.  There did seem to be a disparity in loot drops with a lot of random low level crap. Some of the people in the main town seemed like they were larger parts of the quest than they were. Sure, they were probably part of the challenge section of the game but I found myself just talking to them just to remove the annoying asterisk on the map so I could find and focus on the actual missions at hand. The Mystic was a nice addition, I liked being able to…

9

Great

Diablo's wondrous Bounties

The game itself is exactly the same as before, even down to graphics but the addition of Reaper of Souls, Rifts, bounties, new class, etc. I can overlook that, the new chapter adds a new artisan whilst creating a nice setup for sequels whilst the rift gives the game life beyond the story.

Overall

 

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